Sekaiitto Premium Momoshu 720ML

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$69.97
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$69.97
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Sku : 11ed0414c2b31086a75602935d1e3908

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Daiginjo is one of the higher grades of sake, the rice wine that has become a strong symbol of Japan's national culture. The highest grade of rice is used in a labour intensive process to create Daiginjo, often representing the height of the brewmasters's ability. It is an elegant, highly-regarded sake that is often reserved for special occasions and ceremonies, although considered slightly less fine than Junmai Daiginjo (pure Daiginjo) as it may be fortified with distilled alcohol.

Sake can be found in a variety of types and styles, each with its own organoleptic properties. The classification of sake is influenced by a variety of things, including the type of rice used, where it was grown, where the sake was produced, the degree of rice polishing, the water source, the brewing process as well as how the sake is filtered post-fermentation. One of the fastest growing categories of the sake industry is sparkling sake, locally known as Awa, of which may be created via several different methods.

For a sake to qualify as Daiginjo, it must be made with rice grains that have been polished, a process which removes the bran from the outer surface of the rice grain to improve the taste. For perspective, to get white rice from brown rice, polishing off ten percent of the original weight is required. If a label of sake is labelled as been polished to 60 percent, that states that 40 percent of the outer layer has been removed. Polished percentages of higher grades of sake range from 50 to 70 percent, removing 30 to 50 percent of the outer layer. Daiginjo, being a higher grade of sake, requires polishing to 50 percent, the utmost level in sake production. In comparison, futsu the everyday sake that sometimes referred to as table sake, is barely polished to between a mere 70 and 93 percent. 

Additionally, at least 15 percent of the rice used in these sakes must be affected by koji-kin, a filamental fungus that helps to break down starches into sugar. Koji (Aspergillus oryzae) is also used in the production of other fermented food products, including soy sauce, mirin and miso paste.